Van's Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning Service

352.669.1540 • 1.800.691.2229

News for Your Carpet

Jun
13
2018

How to treat a pet stain...

STEP 1. Cover spill with WHITE napkin or paper towels. DO NOT use colored paper! It might transfer onto the carpet. Be sure to use a THICK stack to absorb as much of the spot as possible.

STEP 2. Blot by stepping on the stack of towels. REPEAT THIS PROCESS UNTIL NO TRANSFER TAKES PLACE. DO NOT RUB!!!

STEP 3. Apply Spotting Agent. Warning: DO NOT use spot removers that you get at the grocery store! They leave a sticky residue behind and may discolor your carpet. Get a bottle of Home Pro Spotter Free from Van's Carpet Cleaning with cleaning.

STEP 4. REPEAT Steps 1 & 2. If the spot does not come out, DO NOT attempt any further action, as you may set the spot and/or damage your carpet. Instead, call us immediately at 352.669.1540. If it is after hours, keep it moist until morning by misting a little more solution or water. Leave a voice mail and we will contact you immediately the next business day.

PET SPOTS:

Only use Pet Spotter on pet spots. Urine turns to “alkaline” from being exposed to oxygen. Pet Spotter is designed to neutralize urine salts.

GET YOUR CARPET CLEANED AS SOON AFTER A PET SPOT AS POSSIBLE!

Even when you do a great job cleaning the spot, urine salts can still be left behind which will be discolor your textile and collect odor causing bacteria. 

Warning: DO NOT use over the counter spotters for urine. They are not designed to neutralize the urine salts.

May
24
2018

Helping Water Clean Better

Water is a great cleaner. But just like you, sometimes it needs a little help...H2O is a fantastic liquid. It is useful for manufacturing, transportation, firefighting, energy production, cooking, agriculture, recreation and of course, drinking. Water also has some unique qualities that make it an excellent cleaner.

Water is a polar molecule, meaning it has both positively and negatively charged sides. Without going into too much chemistry here, this means that water can attract and surround a great variety of substances. Think about everything that water can dissolve or dilute and you begin to understand why water is referred to as the “universal solvent.” But water can’t dissolve everything. Dirt and grime usually adhere to skin, clothing, and other surfaces by combining with body oils, cooking fats, lubricating greases, and similar substances. Because these substances don’t mix with water, washing with water can’t remove them or the bonded soil. Sometimes it needs a little help. Here are some ways that we can help water clean better.

  • Emulsification
    Detergent and soap molecules have a dual nature. One end of the molecule called the head attracts to water; the other end, the tail, attracts to oily soils. The tails attach to the soil; the heads remain in the water. This action breaks the oil and soils into tiny soap-enclosed droplets called micelles, which disperse throughout the solution. The micelles repel each other because of their charged surfaces, so the oils can’t join together once separated. This process of separating and suspending oils in a water-based solution is called emulsification. With the oil no longer bonding the dirt to the soiled surface, the soap-enclosed oils and soils can easily be rinsed away.
  • Water softeners
    Hard water contains minerals, primarily calcium and magnesium dissolved from rock and soil as water passes through the earth. Hard water is a problem because it reduces the effectiveness of soaps and detergents. Detergents react with calcium and magnesium, so it takes more detergent to get the job done. The hard water reaction with soaps is what creates the sticky residue called soap scum. Water softeners remove calcium and magnesium, increasing the effectiveness of cleaners. Soft water cleans better, rinses better and allows you to use less soap or detergent.
  • Temperature
    Heat reduces the surface tension of water, making it easier to penetrate and dissolve soils. Heat increases the effectiveness of soaps and detergents, so they work more efficiently. Hot water also helps melt and dissolve greases, oils, and waxes. All of this means that using hot water makes cleaning easier and allows you to use less detergent.
  • pH
    One way to help water clean better is by adjusting its pH. Pure water has a neutral pH, neither acidic nor alkaline. By adding cleaning agents, we can change the pH of water. Since most common soils are acidic, most detergents are alkaline. When an alkaline detergent contacts an acidic soil, the soil is neutralized. In most cases, this results in more efficient cleaning, easier rinsing, and less scrubbing.
  • Saponification
    Saponification is a process that changes natural fats and oils into soap. Many years ago, people made their own soap by combining animal or vegetable fats with lye, a strong alkali. Similarly, using an alkaline detergent has a similar effect on fats and food oils, basically turning them into soap, which can then be rinsed away with water.

Of course, there is more to cleaning than what we have discussed here. For best results, you need the right tools, techniques, training, and experience. Fortunately, you don’t have to be a chemist or engineer to keep your house clean and healthy. Following manufacturer instructions on appliances and cleaning products generally yields good results.

When it comes to professional carpet and textile cleaning, you can be confident that your educated and experienced Van’s Carpet Cleaning technicians will use the right cleaning agents, equipment, and techniques to produce fantastic results with “plain old” water!

Call Today! 352.669.1540

Apr
12
2018

Three Steps for Proper Carpet Care

Carpet cleaning is just like exercise! If you get into a routine and keep it up, you will see great results and feel better about it. And understanding the right way to clean carpet will help you save time by doing it correctly the first time with products that do the job right from the start. Not only will Seal of Approval cleaning products help keep your carpet looking great, they can also help meet the warranty requirements of the carpet manufacturer. Below are three simple steps to keeping your carpet clean and looking great:

  1. Vacuum at the right frequency with a CRI-approved vacuum.
  2. Clean spots and spills quickly with products that do not damage the carpet or cause it to re-soil more quickly.
  3. Professionally deep clean your carpets every 12 to 18 months to remove embedded dirt and grime.
Mar
05
2018

Carpet Repair & Re-Stretching

After a period of years, depending on soiling, traffic and installation, carpet may need to be restretched. If you have "buckles" in your carpet, we recommend carpet restretching. We use a power stretcher to get your carpet as tight or tighter than when it was new. If you have holes, seams coming apart or any other damage to your carpet, an expert carpet repair can be done for you.
 
Call Today for Your Free estimate!
Van's Carpet Cleaning Svc

 

Feb
02
2018

Bacteria, Fungi Spores, Oh My!

When you are in the business of cleaning, questions often arise regarding disinfecting and sanitizing. Recent Flu epidemics and the MRSA strain of bacteria have raised concerns among people regarding how to protect from possible infection. Fortunately, antimicrobials offer protection from unseen germs and bacteria on many surfaces. There are three levels of antimicrobials that kill or limit microbes and the spores that they use to reproduce. Sterilizer A sterilizer kills 100% of microbes and spores. In the spectrum of antimicrobial activity, a sterilizer is the strongest. Sterilization is impractical for everyday use because bacterial and fungal spores are extremely difficult to destroy. Extreme heat is one method of sterilization, but it is not practical outside of a medical environment.

Chemical sterilizers are toxic, corrosive irritants that are not safe for use by the general public. Sanitizers To sanitize a surface means to reduce levels of harmful microbes to a safe level. Most chemicals sanitizers have little or no effect on certain bacteria like Tuberculosis, and improper use may create resistant strains of harmful bacteria. Disinfectants Disinfectant is an EPA regulated term  that can only be used on the label of products that have been tested and proven to kill or destroy at least 99.9% of all microorganisms; this doesn’t mean they destroy spores. There are a variety of disinfectants available to consumers, including common household bleach. Caution must be exercised when using bleach or any other EPA registered disinfectant to follow label directions carefully as misuse can lead to damage to materials or health risks.

Disinfectants are named as to what kind of organisms they kill. The suffix cide, meaning “to kill” is added after the type of microorganism it targets. So a bactericide kills bacteria, fungicide kills fungi, and a virucide destroys viruses. Read the label to find out what the product is designed to do.

What should you use? Since sterilizers are only needed for critical jobs like surgical instruments, we are left with disinfectants and sanitizers. As we have seen, sanitizers do not have the “kill power” that disinfectants do.

So why would you choose to use a sanitizer instead of a disinfectant? You make the decision by weighing the risk presented by the microorganisms against the risks involved with the chemical itself. For example, there are chemical sanitizers that are used in commercial kitchens which are designed for treating food preparation surfaces. These products control bacteria on relatively clean surfaces but present almost no risk because of low toxicity. In a hospital things are different with known health issues at stake. People with a variety of sicknesses create the potential for contamination of many surfaces. Also, there are people with compromised immune systems who could become seriously ill from exposure to common microbes. When the risk from infection are greater, the necessity for a high-grade disinfectant becomes apparent. Although these tend to have higher levels of toxicity, the potential risk warrants their use. Your home is similar. Your kitchen counter is generally clean. Therefore keeping it clean usually means simply maintaining a sanitary condition. If you prepare raw meats on the counter you may consider using a good sanitizer/cleaner. In the bathroom a stronger disinfectant might be appropriate. You could also use a surface disinfectant in sick rooms to kill infectious microbes. A clean home is important. But, the most important thing to remember is that all cleaning agents, sanitizers and disinfectants should be stored and used according to the label directions. Failure to do so could cause more harm than good.

How to Select a Professional Cleaning Firm

Don’t be victimized by uninformed, uneducated or downright unscrupulous cleaners!

Exclusive Cleaning Tips and Special Offers

Enter your email address below to sign up for our newsletter where you will receive exclusive cleaning tips as well as other special offers! Offer valid for new customers only.

What Others Say

I am very impressed how all my carpets came so clean & smells just like new again. I had a dog very sick & even though I kept spot cleaning after her, the stains kept getting worse. I thought my carpet was ruined. Now, they are so clean, it looks like I’m moving in my house again. It’s wonderful! Thank you so very much!

Lisa Looper - Eustis, FL

Excellent service and peformance!

Susan Jones, The Villages FL

How To Avoid Nightmare Cleaners

Sign up today to receive our free e-book, How to Avoid Nightmare Carpet Cleaners. This is a must read before hiring any carpet cleaner!

* indicates required field.

FREE Stain Removal Report

Find out which stains are removable from carpets and rugs with this free report!

Get Free Report

Connect With Us

Van’s Carpet Cleaning Accepts:

credit_cards_accepted

Van’s Carpet Cleaning is a proud member of the following organizations:
Tavares Chamber of Commerce • Eustis Chamber of Commerce • IICRC • BNI Wildwood • Phenomenal Product • The Breakfast Club